APRJA

APRJA: a peer-reviewed journal about… on post-digital research (2014)

“Post-digital, once understood as a critical reflection of “digital” aesthetic immaterialism, now describes the messy and paradoxical condition of art and media after digital technology revolutions. “Post-digital” neither recognizes the distinction between “old” and “new” media, nor ideological affirmation of the one or the other. It merges “old” and “new”, often applying network cultural experimentation to analog technologies which it re-investigates and re-uses. It tends to focus on the experiential rather than the conceptual. It looks for DIY agency outside totalitarian innovation ideology, and for networking off big data capitalism. At the same time, it already has become commercialized.”

Summer School: Social Studies of Algorithms

Call for Applicants: Summer School of the International Algorithm Studies Network

Date: 4-8 July, 2016
Place: Stockholm, Sweden

Deadline: Friday, 18 March 2016. Participants will be notified no later than March 31. Reading lists and more information will be sent out in the beginning of June.

Stephen Wolfram on “personal analytics”

From “The Personal Analytics of My Life“:

…”now I have what is probably one of the world’s largest collections of personal data.

Every day—in an effort at “self awareness”—I have automated systems send me a few emails about the day before. But even though I’ve been accumulating data for years—and always meant to analyze it—I’ve never actually gotten around to doing it. But with Mathematica and the automated data analysis capabilities we just released in Wolfram|Alpha Pro, I thought now would be a good time to finally try taking a look—and to use myself as an experimental subject for studying what one might call “personal analytics”.”

CFP: Computing the Corporeal

Special issue of Computational Culture, a Journal of Software Studies on “computing the corporeal“:

“Whilst the idea that immediate data may demand a “bodying forth” (Thrift 2008), a traffic of bodiliness from biological to technological contexts, it is necessary to de-homogenise the ‘body’ category. Perhaps what is needed is an understanding of “corporeality” that assume multidimensional and relativistic realities of bodies instead, opening up nuanced discourses based on specific body-related ontologies (corpuscles, builds, anatomies, skeletons, muscle systems) all making up a non-singular sense of the bodily real. As such, this collection poses the problem of criteria. Our question is this: how and to what effect does the research community adopt arbitrary criteria in order to compute the body and bodily movement? Can we define narratives emerging from this body-computing arbitration to provoke a critique?”

Further reading on algorithms & algorithmic culture

Critical Algorithm Studies: a Reading List

Tarleton Gillespie, Algorithm [draft] [#digitalkeywords] (2014)

—. “#trendingistrending: When Algorithms Become Culture,” forthcoming in Algorithmic Cultures: Essays on Meaning, Performance and New Technologies, eds. Robert Seyfert and Jonathan Roberge (Routledge 2016)

Rob Kitchin, “Thinking critically about and researching algorithms” (2014)